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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

1 edition of Correspondence with Mr. Mason respecting blockade, and recognition of the Confederate States found in the catalog.

Correspondence with Mr. Mason respecting blockade, and recognition of the Confederate States

by Great Britain. Foreign Office

  • 53 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Printed by Harrison and Sons in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Correspondence,
  • Blockades,
  • Blockade,
  • Naval operations,
  • Foreign relations,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesNorth America -- no. 2 (1863)
    ContributionsMason, James M. (James Murray), 1798-1871, Russell, John Russell, Earl, 1792-1878
    The Physical Object
    Pagination17 p. ;
    Number of Pages17
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24995248M
    OCLC/WorldCa13549074

    Why Semmes of the Alabama Was Not Tried (Part I) by admitting them to parole; that by establishing a blockade of Confederate ports, and a Brigadier-General in the Confederate States Army.   President Davis hopes to prevent possibility of seizure of Confederate States slaves and delivering them for conveyance to West Indies Instead of Africans rescued on the high seas. [excerpt] State Department to J. M. Mason, London. Sept. 26(No. 7.) Instructions regarding dispatches, 12 to 14, 4 .

    Full text of "Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, " See other formats.   §EARL RUSSELL. I quite admit the right of the noble Lord to call in question the conduct of the Government with respect to the blockade which has been established by the Northern States of America; nor, indeed, should I complain if any noble Lord had called in question the whole of the conduct of the Government with respect to the unfortunate division which has taken place in America; for I.

    James Dunwoody Bulloch, The Secret Service of the Confederate States in Europe, or How the Confederate Cruisers Were Equipped (, reprint ), pp. 48 - 4. Ephraim Douglass Adams, Great Britain and the American Civil War () Vol. 2, p. 5. Bulloch, Confederate Cruisers, pp. . Outright war between the U.S. and Britain was a possibility in the fall of , when a U.S. naval officer, Captain Charles Wilkes, took control of a British mail ship and seized two Confederate diplomats. Confederate President Jefferson Davis had named James M. Mason and John Slidell as commissioners to represent Confederate interests abroad; Mason was en route to England and Slidell to France.


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Correspondence with Mr. Mason respecting blockade, and recognition of the Confederate States by Great Britain. Foreign Office Download PDF EPUB FB2

Correspondence with Mr. Mason respecting blockade, and recognition of the Confederate States by Great Britain. Foreign Office; Mason, James M. (James Pages: Read eBook: Correspondence with Mr. Mason: Respecting Blockade, and Recognition of the Confederate States (Classic Reprint) (Paperback) \ QVZFV4T4PWMW Created Date Z.

Foreign Office: Correspondence with the United States ambassador respecting the treatment of British prisoners of war and interned civilians in Germany. (London, H. Stationery off., Harrison and sons, printers, ), also by United States. Legation. Correspondence with Mr. Mason respecting blockade and recognition of the Confederate states / By Great Britain.

Foreign Office, Earl John Russell Russell and J. (James Murray) Mason. The Confederate States of America sought international recognition and legitimacy and sent representatives to Europe to pursue those objectives. The initial Confederate mission, led by William Yancey, met with little success; and he was recalled in the fall of (1) On Janua new representative, James Murray Mason, arrived in Author: Charles M.

Hubbard. GREGORY gave notice that, on Friday, the 7th of March, on going into Committee of Supply, he should call attention to the blockade of the ports of the Confederate States of America, and move. Full text of "Correspondence respecting the "Alabama."" See other formats.

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion: Ser. I, V.Ser. II Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion: Ser. I, V. Ser. II, United States. Naval War Records Office: Authors: United States.

Navy Department, United States. Naval War Records Office: Publisher. An example of the diplomatic blockade enforced by the United States against our Commissioners is given in a correspondence between Earl Russell and Mr.

Mason, and will give some idea of how Mr. Mason and other envoys were met at every turn by rebuffs under Mr. Seward 's promptingssometimes with evasion, but more often with the absurd assumption. Full text of "The Official Correspondence on the Claims of the United States in Respect to " See other formats.

The Public Life and Diplomatic Correspondence of James M. Mason: With Some Personal History by Virginia Mason (his Daughter). Virginia Mason Neale Publishing Company, - Confederate States of America - pages.

This has been done in other similar cases of States not recognized by Her Majesty, and it would be in conformity with the amity professed by the so-styled Confederate States towards Her Majesty and the British nation, if arrangements could be made for correspondence between agents appointed by Her Majesty's Government, to reside in the Confederate States, and the authorities of such States.

Recognition as a belligerent did not mean the same thing, however, as recognition of the Confederate States of America as a sovereign nation separate from the United States of America. However Bulloch was undeterred in his task, and he and the English shipbuilders were very crafty about dealing with these obstacles.

MASON urges the English Government to declare the blockade of the ports of the South a nullity, or not to respect it, because it can he shown that the North has not been able to render it. of Parliament. Mason's correspondence runs through a period of about a year, and dis cretes with ability and clearness the questions of blockade, recognition and intervention.

After reading all the letters, remarks the Rich mond fPkig, no impartial mind will fail to cob clnde that Mr. has presented these subjects in such a light as to. correspondence with mr. mosley of manchester. members of parliament on the topic. the voice of the conservatives.

tone of the press. emissary mason on recognition. the blockade of bermuda. Further correspondence respecting the enlistment of British seamen at Queenstown on board the United States ship-of-war Kearsarge. (Documents ) Correspondence with Mr. Mason, commissioner of the so-styled Confederate States of America.

INTERCEPTED REBEL CORRESPONDENCE.; The Documents Captured on the Steamer Robert E. Lee. Inside Views of Rebel Intrigues in Europe. Ex-Consul De. Chapter 3: United States Coast Survey, – 1. Weddle, “Blockade Board of and Union Naval Strategy,” 2.

Slotten, Patronage, Practice, and the Culture of American Science. See also the National Archives and Records Administration at College Park for microfilm of Record Group 60 for Bache’s correspondence between and Cited by: 1. Full text of "The secret service of the Confederate States in Europe; or, How the Confederate cruisers were equipped" See other formats.

Recognizing Mr. Mason only as an unofficial though representative Southerner, whose views would be a test of the disposition of the rebels on the subject of Slavery, and anxious to afford that.erupted during the war: the fight to break the Union blockade, battles in Congress, on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, and the failed battle for international Confederate recognition.

This last issue was the fight the South needed to win in order to prevail in the larger conflict and gain its independence.CHAPTER II. RUNNING THE LAND BLOCKADE. KING COTTON BEHIND THE SCENES. O N the 4th of February,the Confederate Congress met at Montgomery, Ala.

It was composed of nine delegates from Alabama, three from Florida, ten from Georgia, six from Louisiana, seven from Mississippi, three from North Carolina, seven from South Carolina—forty-five in all.